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New ICC regulations to co...
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India to play four hockey...
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Asian Games - How Sarita ...
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How Ravichandran Ashwin p...
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Yesterday 06:40 PM
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Play in our land, Afghani...
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Yesterday 06:35 PM
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  New ICC regulations to come into effect with Pakistan and Australia series
Posted by: mmadhankumar - Yesterday 10:28 PM - No Replies

The new playing conditions for Tests, One-Day Internationals (ODI) and Twenty 20 Internationals (T20Is) will come into effect with the series between Pakistan and Australia, which starts here on October 5.

One of the new rules is that the player shall not be permitted to bat in the match until his team's batting innings has been in progress for the length of playing time that is equal to stay on the ground. However, once his side has lost five wickets in its batting innings, he may bat immediately.

One of the many amendments that were agreed upon by the International Cricket Council (ICC) members was the induction of real-time 'snickometer' in the list of approved technology.

The other main amendment to the playing conditions is termed Nomination of Players, where in a playing condition has been added to provide clarification on the ground movement/action of a player/player support personnel who has been suspended in accordance with the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel.

One more new amendment is that the player shall not be permitted to bat in the match until his team's batting innings has been in progress for the length of playing time that is equal to the unexpired penance time carried forward from the previous innings, subject to a maximum cumulative penance time of 120 minutes. However, once his side has lost five wickets in its batting innings, he may bat immediately. If any unexpired penance time remains at the end of that batting innings, it is carried forward to the next and subsequent innings of the match.

Also, The player shall not be permitted to bowl in the match until he has either been able to field, or his team has subsequently been batting, for the total length of playing time for which he was absent (hereafter referred to as penance time), subject to a maximum cumulative penance time of 120 minutes. If any unexpired penance time remains at the end of an innings, it is carried forward to the next and subsequent innings of the match.

A T20I innings has been increased from 80 minutes to 85 minutes and the minimum over-rate to be achieved will be 14.11.

New ICC regulations to come into effect with Pakistan and Australia series - Yahoo News India

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  Asian Games - How Sarita Devi was reduced to a sideshow
Posted by: nairrk - Yesterday 06:57 PM - No Replies

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There was a huge controversy at the Asian Games 2014 on Tuesday when ace Indian boxer Sarita Devi, had to settle for a bronze medal despite dominating her semifinal bout against local favourite Jina Park in the 60kg category.

The 32-year-old boxer from Manipur dominated majority of the bout. The judges, however, thought otherwise and declared the Korean as the winner.

The decision, which drew huge criticism, left Sarita in a state of shock and she was seen weeping inconsolably. Sarita's husband Thoiba Singh was heard screaming at the officials and also got into a scuffle with security officials.

Sarita borrowed $500 and lodged an official complaint against the result. It didn't work out in her favour as according to the rules, a player cannot challenge the result of the judges.


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On Wednesday, Sarita once again broke down during the medal ceremony. She sent the crowd and the officials in a state of shock as she refused to accept the bronze medal. She however accepted the flowers which were offered to her by the officials.

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The story didn't end there and Sarita Devi went to local Jina and gave her bronze medal to her. The Korean too was in a state of shock and she later on offered her silver medal to Sarita, who expectedly, refused to take it.


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Towards the end, Sarita's bronze medal was left on the podium even when all the athletes had left. Later on, a volunteer came and took the medal away.

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Asian Games 2014: How Sarita Devi was reduced to a sideshow | Zee News

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  How Ravichandran Ashwin played a role in ICC’s crackdown on chucking
Posted by: nairrk - Yesterday 06:40 PM - No Replies

[Image: How_Ravichandran_Ashwin_played_a_role_in_ICC_s_c.jpg]
Ashwin bowling with full sleeves during the Asia Cup

On 26th February, during India's match against Bangladesh in the Asia Cup, R Ashwin – India's premier spinner was introduced to bowl. He dismissed Mominul Haque with the very first ball of his spell. An ordinary delivery that didn't turn much, but somehow went through what looked like a cross-batted attempt to pick a single on the leg side.

Apart from the rare feat of a stumping from Dinesh Karthik - the batsman, other players and most importantly the viewers were stunned by something that Ashwin did.

The Chennai Super Kings spinner was wearing a full-sleeved jersey as opposed to the half-sleeves we are used to seeing him in. The followers of the game would know that most spinners who have a dodgy element to their action prefer to play in full-sleeves that aid them in hiding any bend above the permissible 15 degrees. This, if you look around, would include the best in the world – the Narines, Ajmals and even Harbhajan Singh on most occasions.

Another thing Ashwin did differently that day was the way he delivered the ball – he had completely changed his action and approach to the crease, so much so that similarity of this action to that of Sunil Narine's was a point of talk in the commentary box as well. He continued to employ the same action for a few more games in the Asia Cup before he went back to his original bowling action.





A few games later, the then 27-year-old had this to say when asked about the change in approach:
“I want to do something different. I want to keep trying something — unless you try you don’t go and venture and find out what can work or not. I’d never bowled in full-sleeves before. So I wanted to see how it would feel. And I just wanted to see if you can get more revs on the ball if you can do a little bit with your elbow, as much as that is. That’s what it was all about. You can get a lot of advantage with these things — so why should I lag behind if someone else is getting a competitive edge?”

Now, when we put together the pieces of the puzzle, it increasingly looks like a cheeky attempt from the Indian cricketer to expose the unfair advantage that others like Narine seemed to be benefiting from. If this is what prompted the administrators to take a serious look into blatant violations of an integral rule of the game, then kudos to him and the activist in Ashwin.

Anyone who has followed cricket in the last few decades will know that there have been 'great bowlers' around who have continued to chuck and made careers out of it. We have wondered how these guys continued to bowl and the cricketing fraternity – the small tightly knit unit that it was – continued to conveniently ignore the few chuckers around. This is probably what has led to several "quality bowlers" and "mystery spinners" sprouting up across the globe in recent times as well.

Chucking is obviously not acceptable and I’d say the ICC has done well to wake up to the problem.

How Ravichandran Ashwin played a role in ICC’s crackdown on chucking - Yahoo Cricket India

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  Play in our land, Afghanistan tells cricket world
Posted by: nairrk - Yesterday 06:35 PM - No Replies

Money from Germany is being used to build one stadium in the war-torn nation and interest is growing as Afghanistan has qualified for next year's World Cup.

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INCHEON - Afghanistan's cricket chief on Wednesday called on top nations to tour the country, insisting it is safe and has world class facilities boosted by foreign money.

Money from Germany is being used to build one stadium in the war-torn nation and interest is growing as Afghanistan has qualified for next year's World Cup.

"I am telling the players to come to my country and play there, they will treasure those memories for ever," Afghanistan Cricket Board chairman Shahzada Masoud told AFP at the Asian Games.

"We want support from other nations. We had lots of problems in the last 30 years because of the uncertain security situation, but that needs to be erased from our minds and heart now.

"Because sport unites people. Cricket is one of our favourite sports. You get 20,000-30,000 people watching our local league matches. The security is good, especially for cricketers.

"Our teams travels around the country without guards. We don't need those guards. People love them because they represent the country."

Masoud said a new stadium in Jalalabad was comparable to any stadium in Asia, and has already hosted club and first-class teams from Pakistan.

Foreign assistance is boosting cricket facilities in Afghanistan. The Indian government has given a grant of one million dollars to build a new stadium in Kandahar.

German boost to cricket

And Germany, a non-cricketing nation, has sanctioned 700,000 euros for a stadium in Khost province, Masoud said.

"We are grateful to both India and Germany for their support," he said. "But what we want now is for teams like India to come any play on our grounds.

"It would have been so exciting if Sachin Tendulkar had come and played in our country. I hope Mahendra Singh Dhoni can make it."

Afghanistan has come a long way since the national team was formed in 2001 and played their first Asian Cricket Council tournament for non-Test nations in 2003.

They qualified for the World Twenty20 in the Caribbean in 2010 and have already taken part in subsequent tournaments in 2012 in Sri Lanka and in Bangladesh earlier this year.

But Afghanistan's greatest achievement so far is qualifying for next year's showpiece 50-over World Cup in Australia and New Zealand.

"We have achieved a lot in a short time, I don't think anyone expected us to get this far," Masoud, a minister in the Hamid Karzai government, said.

"The future of cricket is bright in our country. It is played in 32 of our 34 provinces. And matches are shown on local television."

Masoud said thousands turned up to get a glimpse of the World Cup trophy when it was brought to Afghanistan during a world tour organised by the International Cricket Council recently.

"The World Cup is big news in Afghanistan," he said. "The youth of the country want the team to do well there. We know it will be a tough tournament, but our target is to defeat established teams like Bangladesh.

"We beat them on their soil in the Asia Cup this year, so there is no reason why we can't do it again."

Afghanistan are currently touring Australia under new coach Andy Moles, a former English first-class cricketer, to prepare for the World Cup.

But keen to match, or surpass, their silver-medal winning performance at the previous Asian Games four years ago, the team management flew down four top players, including captain Mohammad Nabi, from Australia to Incheon to reinforce the second-string team.

Afghanistan will also play four one-dayers in the United Arab Emirates in December and take part in a one-day tournament in the West Indies in January to prepare for the World Cup.

Assistant coach Raees Ahmadzai, who is looking after the team at the Asian Games, said the management wanted to build a true cricket culture among the players.

"That includes better fitness and learning how to perform in front of live TV because most of our big matches are televised these days," Ahmadzai said. "Also, they need to learn to face the media."

Play in our land, Afghanistan tells cricket world - Yahoo Cricket India

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  Botha calls for more flexibility for spinners
Posted by: nairrk - Yesterday 06:00 PM - No Replies

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Johan Botha: 'In a game where batters are dominating it is exciting to see guys with different actions.' © Getty Images

Johan Botha, the former South Africa offspinner and current South Australia player, has suggested that the ICC increase the degree of permitted flex, possibly to around 20-25 degrees, following its crackdown on suspect bowling actions. Botha said easing the limits would allow spinners with different actions to compete better in a game that is dominated by batsmen.

Since June this year, ICC's match officials have reported six bowlers for suspect actions and Pakistan offspinner Saeed Ajmal is among those who have been banned from bowling after their actions were deemed illegal during testing. In the ongoing Champions League Twenty20, four bowlers, including West Indian offspinner Sunil Narine, have been reported for suspect actions.

"I wouldn't wish it on any bowler, bowling for their careers. They are both world-class performers," Botha told the Courier Mail. "In a game where batters are dominating it is exciting to see guys with different actions.

"I understand the ICC move but the 15 degrees might have to be shifted up a bit, 20-25 degrees even, I am not sure. You don't want it blatant. However with all these guys going down and a World Cup around the corner, I, as a spectator, want to see batters working hard through the 15-40 over period when the game can die out.

"The variations of Muttiah Muralitharan and Shane Warne made people excited and come through the turnstiles. Doosras need to be looked at but for normal spin I don't think a few degrees makes a lot of difference."

Botha has had problems with his bowling action throughout his career. He was first reported in January 2006, soon after his Test debut in Sydney, and was subsequently banned from bowling.

In August that year, his action was declared illegal once again, after which he was cleared to bowl in November. In 2009, following an ODI against Australia in Port Elizabeth, Botha was reported once again and this time the ICC ruled that his action while bowling the doosra was illegal and he was banned from bowling it. His other deliveries, however, were found to be within permissible limits. In October 2013, he was cited for a doubtful bowling action while playing for South Australia, before having his action cleared by Cricket Australia.

Australia Cricket News: Johan Botha calls for more flexibility for spinners | ESPN Cricinfo

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